A Spot of Color

A Spot of Color

play spots

A Spot of Color

It was such a gray and gloomy day for south Texas but a good opportunity to try my newly purchased Dye-Na-Flo paints. Practice comes first before making the “real” project. Checking out the colors on a practice scrap of the canvas I intend to use also provided an opportunity to try a glue resist. Many articles read over the years in Quilting Arts magazine gave me encouragement to just experiment. It was, after all, a scrap. Well, now I like the outcome and will have to think of something to make with the sample scrap—provided the glue does wash out without washing out the color. Instructions say to heat set and then rinse but no can do with the glue on it. The glue has to be washed out after soaking for at least 10 minutes. The experiment is not done yet but it was worth a photo at this point just in case. The colors at this point are exactly what I want for the iris I have planned for the canvas. I used a permanent marker that I hope will be the resist and have my picture drawn. I will have to remind myself that it is just a tote bag for carrying groceries—whether it turns out good or bad. Hopefully it will add to my confidence and lead to other projects I have in mind for the paint. I really like the way the paint migrated with the added salt and think that will be a good technique on the iris.

Helpful hint:  I used a piece of leftover shelf plastic to protect my counter top. Just right for a small space and small piece.

Charity Quilting for Kids

The Rockport quilt guild, Piecemakers by the Bay, held a workday for making “quilts for kids”, one of the many charitable projects they support.  It was my first time attending this work day and it was an inspiring event.  Over 50 women gathered with sewing machines or cutting tools to finish 34 quilts for kids needing the warmth and love poured into each.  The pictures below show some of the action of pressing   the day times 50. simple quilting Chocolate was provided and door prizes called out periodically kept the sewists on their toes.

Pansies

Pansies

My first garden had pansies.  I got them planted late and my grandmother said they wouldn’t do well because they liked cool weather. I didn’t know details of planting a flower garden.  I just liked the bright colors and never mind the details–like watering, weeding and something about dead heading.  I didn’t plant pansies again for a long time after that first summer garden.  Now we plant them as winter Texans and then take them back to Hannibal and they last all summer.  My best luck, however, is with fabric flowers and I love learning new ways to portray them in quilted projects.  This pansy was started in a class with Lenore Crawford at Quilt Week Paducah, 2014.  It’s not quite done but I am happy with the progress thus far.  Full picture when I finish it but the lack of accessibility of thread close by will mean putting it away until later.

Spring Daffodils, March Block of Month

Spring Daffodils, March Block of Month

spring daffodil blog

Since March is my birthday month I looked for a block that represented birthdays. My first thought was “cake stand” but I also found “Happy Birthday”, “Birthday Cake” and “Birthday Parties”. Spring Daffodil is adapted from “Happy Birthday” as identified in Jinny Beyer’s book, The Quilter’s Album of Patchwork Patterns. Daffodils were always one of the first harbingers of spring growing up and a spring favorite of my mother’s. Also a favorite of mine but I’m just not much of a cultivator of flowers in the ground. I do love them large and bold in fabrics however!
This block was made using scraps from other projects so dig down in your stash and pick out your favorite spring blues or choose your own color palette.

Various blue prints: twelve 3 ½” x 6 ½” rectangles and four 3 ½” corner squares.
Dark blue: fat quarter (two 10” squares cut in half diagonally)
Neutral: ½ yard or 14” square
Scraps of yellows and greens for daffodil applique (my contribution to the block).
You can find simple line drawings online of daffodils or draw your own. If you leave me a note on the blog I can send you a pdf of the drawing I made and used for mine. You might also search through your patterns and books. I found it pretty easy to sketch the flower and then just added leaves.

Step 1: Use your favorite method to applique the daffodil to the neutral center square. I used a machine buttonhole stitch after fusing the raw edge applique to the background. Trim to 13 ¼” square.
Step 2: Sew dark blue half squares to each side of the applique center. Trim to 18 ½” square.
Step 3: Join three 3 ½” x 6 ½” rectangles and sew to either side of the center square. Join three rectangles and two corner squares for the top and bottom of the block.
Step 4: Layer, quilt, and bind.

I quilted a few snowflakes and added a few beads on the gray polka dot background as March blooming daffodils may experience some snow after peeking through on the south side of our house.

A very fast and simple project. Hope you enjoy trying this one in your favorite spring colors and favorite spring flower.

 

 

Remembering: Under the Quilt

Remembering: Under the Quilt

I grew up knowing that when you were going to a “dress up” or public event proper ladies wore nylon hose. I learned about hosiery when playing under the quilt as my grandmother and her friends quilted at the country church. When starting a new quilt there was lots of room to play underneath the frame because they always started at the outside edges and worked toward the center, rolling up the quilt as it was quilted. Some legs under the quilt wore very opaque and unsightly hosiery. Often those legs were short and fat. Other legs wore very sheer and natural colored hosiery, almost invisible except for the seam going up the back. Those legs seemed longer and more shapely. Some seams were straight and some were rather crooked as they traveled up the back of the leg. And sometimes there were these lighter stripes–they were called runs by the quilt ladies and it was a disaster to have one. And then some legs had “knee highs”, before there really was knee high hose. I learned that if you didn’t want to mess with a girdle (that’s a whole ‘nother story) you might get by with pulling on the hose and just rolling the extra around the knee. But, before you stood up you had to adjust to make sure the top of the hose were still in the right place. After all, dresses were longer then so nobody really knew your secret—–unless you were under the quilt.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T Show and Tell

I belong to guilds in three states and probably enjoy show and tell as much as anything. Each guild varies in how show and tell is treated and when it appears on the agenda. Regardless of when it comes in the meeting it deserves the respect of all members choosing to view. One guild, in particular, does a good job of capturing the full attention of the membership with minimal sidebar conversations. I wonder if the full attention of that guild is based on the timing of the event. Committee reports have been given, program is coming up and people are settled in–that may be the key–settled in but not ready to go out the door for home or other obligations. Whenever the guild has show and tell I know that I need to be supportive of the quilter and their project so those who have not shared will be encouraged to share. I know there are a lot of quilts made in all of the guilds that I belong to that never get displayed for various reasons. I will be more attentive to those sharing so that I can continue to gain ideas and learn of new viewpoints in the world of quilting. I want to see all kinds of quilts–simple, complex, traditional, artistic and everything in betwee. I pledge to be better at respecting the making of quilts and the maker of quilts as they are shared in my guilds.